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Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

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About the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

Enthusiastic and eager to please, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel makes an ideal companion.

Temperament

Cavalier King Charles Spaniels are affectionate, smart and eager to please, making them easy to train. They thrive on companionship and get along well with children and other pets.

Cavaliers are an adaptable breed, so they’ll do well in active or sedentary households. As descendants of hunting dogs, they love to romp outdoors, but are also happy to curl up on their owners’ laps.

Characteristics

The Cavalier is easily recognized by his rich, soft coat and big, round eyes.

Lifespan

12 to 15 years

Colors

Cavaliers have four distinct color variations: white with chestnut markings (known as “Blenheim), white with black markings, black with tan markings and ruby, which is a rich red color.

Shedding

Cavaliers shed occasionally. Regular brushing is recommended to prevent tangles and matting of the medium-length coat.

Health

Like other small dogs, Cavaliers are at risk of obesity. Other health risks include eye conditions like cataracts, knee and hip problems and ear infections. They also have a higher risk for heart problems and certain neurological conditions.

Best Dog Food for Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Dogs & Puppies

A Cavalier King Charles Spaniel will thrive on a complete and balanced small or toy breed dog food. These specially formulated foods are easier for small breeds to chew, thanks to the smaller kibble size.

Cavalier puppies should eat a complete and balanced small or toy breed puppy food for the first year of life. Puppy formulas have added nutrients to aid a puppy’s mental and physical development during this time.

History

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel was named for King Charles II. Toy-sized spaniels remained favorites among British nobility into the 19th century.

In the Victorian age, the Cavalier was bred with Asian toy breeds like the Pug, resulting in the English Toy Spaniel (as it’s known in America; in the United Kingdom, it’s known as the King Charles Spaniel).

The English Toy Spaniel had a flatter face and rounder skull like the Pug and over time, the Cavalier was rendered nearly extinct.

In the 1920s, Roswell Eldridge, an American, offered a cash prize to any British breeder who could reproduce the classic Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, thus resurrecting the breed.

Facts

  • The Cavalier gained notoriety on the television show “Sex and the City” as Charlotte York’s beloved pet.
  • After the house of Stuart fell, people distanced themselves from the breed, making the Cavalier rare.
  • The breed’s four distinct color patterns were each associated with a British noble family at one time or another.

Cesky Terrier

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About the Cesky Terrier

Keen and alert with a balanced temperament, the Cesky Terrier is a pack hunter developed in the Czech Republic. This well-muscled, short-legged breed is a loyal, loving family companion but needs continued socialization due to his reserved nature with strangers. Though not as excitable as other terriers, the Cesky still will chase something of interest. The breed requires regular exercise, and his fine coat needs moderate grooming with monthly clippings.

Chartreux Cat Breed

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About the Chartreux Cat Breed

Often called the smiling cat of France, the Chartreux has a sweet, smiling expression. This sturdy, powerful cat has a distinctive blue coat with a resilient wooly undercoat. Historically known as fine mousers with strong hunting instincts, the Chartreux enjoys toys that move. This is a slow-maturing breed that reaches adulthood in three to five years. A loving, gentle companion, the Chartreux forms a close bond with her family.

Chesapeake Bay Retriever

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About the Chesapeake Bay Retriever

A muscular breed with a slightly wavy coat, the Chesapeake Bay Retriever is known for his determination and perseverance even in icy waters. This retriever is an affectionate family dog that is particularly good with children, though he can be more aggressive than other retrievers. The Chessie needs vigorous daily exercise to stay fit. His harsh, oily double coat repels water and requires little grooming.

Chihuahua

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About the Chihuahua

The Chihuahua sports a big attitude in a petite body. One of the most widely-recognized “purse dogs,” this toy breed rules homes and hearts with his loyalty, charm and confidence.

Temperament

The Chihuahua is often described as having a terrier-like attitude. Alert and confident with an air of self-importance, Chihuahuas are often described as tiny Napoleons. But it’s not all sass with this tiny dog. His loyalty and charm make him an ideal lap dog who loves to spend quality time with his family.

Characteristics

Charming, sassy and graceful, this delightful diva packs a big personality into a portable, diminutive frame. A favorite of city dwellers and celebrities, this popular “purse dog” is up for adventures with their people – so long as it isn’t too cold outside and there isn’t too much exercise involved.

Though he loves spending time with his owner, he does require training. Without it, this king will try to reign over the entire household.

Chihuahuas make excellent city pets, as they need little exercise and enjoy spending time on their owners’ laps. They are too small for the rough play of small kids, but are loyal and adaptable with many types of people, as long as they get quality time and affection.

Lifespan

14 to 16 years 

Colors

Chihuahuas come in a broad range of colors. In fact, the American Kennel Club’s (AKC) standard is any color, solid, marked or splashed.

Shedding

The Chihuahua comes in two different varieties: smooth coat and long coat. Both types are medium shedders, with heavier shedding twice per year and moderate shedding during the rest of the year. 

Health

Chihuahuas are a generally healthy breed. They can suffer from some genetic issues, however, including heart problems, eye disease, epilepsy and loose kneecaps. When adopting a Chihuahua, it’s important to go to a reputable breeder. Additionally, as with all dogs, regular vet check-ups are recommended.

Best Dog Food For Chihuahuas

When choosing a dog food for your Chihuahua, keep his size in mind and select a formula that will maintain his ideal body condition.

Dog foods for Toy Breeds include: 

Best Dog Food For Chihuahua Puppies

Puppies of all breeds have specific nutritional needs, and Chihuahuas are no exception. Look for a puppy food with DHA to nourish brain and vision development. Formulas with antioxidants are also a good choice to support his developing immune system.

Puppy food to consider for your Chihuahua puppy: 

History

Dog trading was common across ancient cultures around the world, so it’s no surprise dogs like Chihuahuas are found on many different continents. It’s believed they descended from a larger breed called the Techichi, however.

The Techichi was bred by the Toltec civilization in Mexico. When the Aztecs conquered the Toltecs in the 12th century, they refined the breed to create the lighter, smaller Chihuahua we know today.

In the mid-1800s, Americans began to take interest in the breed and named it after the Mexican state of Chihuahua, where it was commonly found. In 1908, the AKC registered the first Chihuahua, a male named Beppie, solidifying the Chihuahua’s transition into American hearts and minds.

Facts

  • The Chihuahua ranks #30 in popularity out of the 194 dog breeds recognized by the AKC. 
  • The Chihuahuas are a minor-league baseball team located in El Paso, Texas.
  • The breed has been featured prominently in in movies like “Legally Blonde” and “Beverly Hills Chihuahua.”
  • Chihuahuas (or at least Chihuahua-like ancestors) were depicted in ancient Mexican paintings.
  • A Chihuahua starred in the ubiquitous “Yo Quiero Taco Bell” TV commercials of the late 1990s.

Chinese Crested

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About the Chinese Crested

A slender, fine-boned toy breed, the Chinese Crested is believed to have descended from African hairless dogs. For centuries, the breed accompanied Chinese sailors on the high seas, and sailors frequently traded puppies with local merchants at port cities around the world. Elegant and graceful, the Chinese Crested is a gay, lively dog that makes a playful, loving companion. The breed comes in two coat varieties -- hairless and powderpuff -- both which shed little to no hair.

Chinese Shar-Pei

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About the Chinese Shar-Pei

An ancient breed, the Chinese Shar-Pei has existed in China since 200 B.C. Developed as a multipurpose farm dog, he is noted for his keen intelligence and stubborn nature. He is a quick learner and benefits from early training, socialization and daily exercise. The Chinese Shar-Pei can be aloof and standoffish with strangers but is a devoted family dog. His short, harsh coat requires little grooming.

Chinook

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About the Chinook

Developed as a sled dog, the Chinook is known for his speed, endurance and athleticism. In the early 1900s, Arthur Treadwell Walden created the breed on his New Hampshire farm using a Mastiff-type dog, Greenland Husky, and German and Belgian Shepherds. This versatile breed enjoys hiking, backpacking, jogging, and skijoring with his owners. The Chinook’s thick coat provides protection and requires little grooming.

Chow Chow

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About the Chow Chow

A regal breed with strong muscles and heavy boned, the Chow Chow is an ancient breed from northern China. Although affectionate, he can be stubborn.

Temperament

The affectionate Chow Chow is devoted and loyal to his family, but indifferent to strangers. He makes an excellent guard dog, but his independent, stubborn streak means he needs early socialization and training.

Moderate daily exercise like walks or play with toys will help keep the Chow happy and healthy.

Characteristics

The Chow has a muscular, powerful build in a fairly compact body. His signature look includes a lion’s mane-like ruff of fur around his head and neck. He has a blue-black tongue, deep almond eyes and a slightly wrinkled forehead, lending to his judgmental expression.

Lifespan

8 to 12 years

Colors

Standard Chow Chow colors include red, black, blue, cinnamon or cream.

Shedding

The Chow’s thick double coat may be rough or smooth. Either way, it requires regular grooming. Chows shed seasonally, so brushing twice per week and more frequently during the spring shedding season will suffice.

Health

Aside from being intolerant of high heat and humidity, the Chow Chow may also suffer from hip and elbow dysplasia, eye problems, patellar luxation and thyroid disorders. Working with a responsible breeder will help avoid these health concerns.

Best Dog Food for Chow Chow Dogs & Puppies

Chows will do well on a complete and balanced wet or dry dog food. Chow puppies need puppy food to get all the nutrients they need for healthy growth and development during their first year of life.

History

The Chow Chow may be the world’s oldest breed. Chows were depicted in Chinese artifacts dating back to approximately 206 BC. They spent much of their early years serving as companions to Chinese nobility.

Throughout their long history, however, Chows had numerous jobs, including guarding, hauling and hunting. Chow Chow ancestors may have even been a food source for the northern Chinese.

In the 1820s, Chows were part of a “Wild Dogs of China” exhibit at the London Zoo. It wasn’t until Queen Victoria acquired a Chow in the later 1800s that the breed gained popularity.

Chows came to the U.S. in the 1890s and the American Kennel Club (AKC) registered its first of the breed in 1903.

Facts

  • Martha Stewart owns several Chow Chows who were often featured on her morning show.
  • Many owners believe Chows are cleaner than most dogs, as they have less odor than other canines and housetrain easily.

Cirneco dell’Etna

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About the Cirneco dell’Etna

An ancient Sicilian breed, the Cirneco dell’Etna originated 2,500 years ago as a hardy hunting dog in Egypt before being transported to the Mediterranean basin by the Phoenicians. The breed, whose origins are similar to those of the Pharaoh Hound, evolved by adapting to the environment. Friendly and affectionate, the Cirneco dell’Etna is an excellent family companion. The breed’s intelligent and inquisitive nature makes daily physical exercise and mental stimulation a must. His sleek coat only needs occasional grooming.

Clumber Spaniel

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About the Clumber Spaniel

The Clumber Spaniel is an intelligent and determined dog with a long, low build and slow, rolling gait. The Clumber originated in 18th-century France where he was coveted for his superb hunting ability. Gentle, loyal and affectionate, the Clumber does well with families and other animals. He is enthusiastic about work and play. Clumbers prefer daily walks to heavy exercise. Their dense coats require daily brushing.

Cocker Spaniel

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About the Cocker Spaniel

Bred to hunt woodcock and other birds, the Cocker Spaniel is capable of considerable speed and endurance.

Temperament

The intelligent and cheerful Cocker Spaniel has a unique ability to connect with humans and makes an excellent companion. His gentle, affectionate and playful nature makes him especially good with kids.

He needs daily exercise in the form of a brisk walk or playtime with his favorite people. He’s a people pleaser, so he’s relatively easy to train.

Characteristics

Cocker Spaniels are the smallest of the sporting breeds. Their small bodies are sturdy, and they move with ease. They have large eyes and a long, silky coat.

Lifespan

10 to 14 years

Colors

Cocker Spaniel coat colors include a wide variety, ranging from solid black to red and white and many other color combinations.

Shedding

The Cocker Spaniel is a low-shedding breed, but he requires daily brushing to prevent tangles and mats. Trimming the coat every few months will keep him looking his best.

Health

Overeating and lack of exercise can lead to weight gain and obesity in Cocker Spaniels. The breed is also at risk for hip, knee and eye problems. Responsible breeders screen for these conditions to help produce the healthiest breed possible. Their long ears require regular cleaning to reduce the risk of infection.

Best Dog Food for Cocker Spaniel Dogs & Puppies

Like other small breeds, Cocker Spaniels may benefit from a small breed dog food. For Cockers who need help losing weight, consider a healthy weight formula.

Cocker Spaniel puppies should eat puppy food for their first year of life to aid in their growth and development.  

History

The Cocker Spaniel’s origins trace back to Spain, where the breed got its start as bird hunters. For hundreds of years, the only difference in the categorization of the many breeds of spaniels was whether they hunted on land or in water.

In the 19th century, however, this changed. The Cocker Spaniel was designated as its own breed, named for the woodcock it hunted and its Spanish origins. In the United States, the Cocker was developed into two distinct varieties: American and English.

In the 1940s, the breeds were registered as two distinct breeds by the Canadian, English and American Kennel Clubs. The AKC refers to the U.S. breed simply as the Cocker Spaniel and the British breed as English Cocker Spaniel.

Facts

  • The Cocker Spaniel was one of the first purebred American dogs registered by the AKC. It also reigned as one of the most popular for many years.
  • President Rutherford B. Hayes owned a Cocker Spaniel named “Dot.”
  • Vice President Richard Nixon owned a Cocker named “Checkers.”
  • Another contributing factor to the breed’s popularity was Disney’s Lady & the Tramp, released in 1955.