Dog & Cat Articles with Advice from Our Experts

Four Purina experts

Whether you have a dog, cat or both, our experts are here with all the information and tips you need. We use our Purina expertise to cover topics like dog and cat health, nutrition, behavior, training and more. 

Dog and Cat Articles on Behavior & Health

dog with fireworks illustration
Pet Stress and Anxiety

If your dog is experiencing stress during storms or fireworks, there are several possibilities including sudden, loud noises or flashes of light. Explore other potential causes for your dog’s storm or firework anxiety and how to ease it here with a Purina Behavior Scientist.

woman comforting dog
Tips to Comfort Cats and Dogs with Separation Anxiety

Downtime at home often means pets get to bond with all the members of the family. Whether you’re returning to work or school, when it’s time to transition to a regular routine, pets struggle just like the rest of us.

dog and cat sitting together
Pet Disaster Preparedness: Tips for Creating a Pet Emergency Kit

A pet emergency kit and disaster preparedness plan can help ensure you and your pet stay together in a worst-case scenario. Find out how to create your own pet disaster preparedness plan and emergency kit here.

Dog looking out window
Why are Dogs Scared of Thunder

If you’re wondering why some dogs are scared of thunder, there are several possibilities including the loud noises and flashes of light. Find out some other possible causes for this fear and how to ease your dog’s storm anxiety here. 

how to keep dogs cool in summer
How to Keep Dogs Cool in Summer

Summertime has many people heading outside to enjoy the warm days and sunshine. If you have a dog, though, you may worry about bringing him out in the heat.

Explore Topics Related to Dog & Cat Information

Articles

View
Spending more time at home offers the opportunity to bond with your cat and grooming a great way to do this. Check out these tips to make it easier.
As we’re spending time at home, some pet grooming services aren’t available. Here are practices you can try at home to keep your dog feeling his best.
If you prefer your own diet to be natural or organic, you’re probably considering feeding your cat a natural or organic cat food, too. What’s the difference between the two, though, and how do you decide which is right for your cat? Find out here.
Don’t just assume your dog’s ears itch if he scratches them frequently. It may be a sign of a painful infection. Contact your veterinarian if you notice any of the following changes: ear discharge, a strange odor and head shaking.
What do crystals in cat urine mean, and what can I do about it? A buildup of crystals may lead to a urinary tract problem.
Bladder stones in cats are rock-like minerals that form in the bladder. The correct name for them is “uroliths,” but a bladder stone by any name is a pain for your cat.
Feline Lower Urinary Tract Disease or FLUTD is a common condition seen in cats.  Feline urinary tract disease can affect the urinary bladder (such as cystitis, an inflammation of the bladder) and the urethra, the channel that carries urine from the b
A seizure is sometimes described as an electrical storm in the brain. Brain cells, called neurons, communicate using electrical and chemical signals. A seizure, also referred to as a convulsion or “fit,” occurs when there is a sudden surge of electri
A healthy liver is essential for a healthy pet. Your pet’s liver is vital for metabolism and to get rid of toxic products.
Normal wear and tear on joints occurs daily. Cartilage protects your dog’s bones and joints from the friction caused by everyday movement. Natural glucosamine—a building block of cartilage tissue—can help maintain cartilage for healthy joints and mob
It’s not unusual for dogs to have occasional bouts of constipation or diarrhea that get better on their own. But if your dog has ongoing episodes, or if you see blood or mucous in your pet’s stool, consult a veterinarian.
Is your older cat high-strung? Does she lose weight but eat a lot? She may have an overactive thyroid. Older cats sometimes begin producing too much thyroid hormone. It’s a condition called feline hyperthyroidism.