October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Nearly half of all domestic abuse victims delay leaving because they don’t want
to leave their pet behind, yet as few as 10% of domestic violence shelters accept pets.
The Purple Leash Project is working to change that.

232 Matches
Other Recommendations Based on Your Selections
Filter
How energetic would your ideal cat be?
Filter
How vocal would your ideal cat be?
Filter
What type of personality traits would you prefer your cat to have?
Filter
How attentive would your ideal cat be?
Filter
How often do you plan to groom your cat?
Filter
How much shedding would your ideal cat breed have?

Abyssinian Cat

Your top breed match based on your inputs:

About the Abyssinian Cat

Abyssinians are highly intelligent and intensely inquisitive. They love to investigate and will leave no nook or cranny unexplored. They’re sometimes referred to as “Aby-grabbys” because they tend to take things that grab their interest. The playful Aby loves to jump and climb. Keep a variety of toys on hand to keep her occupied, including puzzle toys that challenge her intelligence.

Temperament

Seemingly always in motion, she’ll slow down occasionally to curl up next to you on the couch or in bed. Although independent, she does best with another Aby companion to match her high activity levels while you’re away. Abyssinians love attention from you and respectful children and get along well with cat-friendly dogs, as well as other pets, like large parrots and ferrets.

Characteristics

The Abyssinian has a wedge-shaped, yet rounded head with broad ears and almond-shaped eyes in shades of gold or green. Her body is muscular and athletic, but slim, and supported by fine-boned legs.

Lifespan

9 to 15 years

Colors

Abyssinians have what is known as a “ticked” coat, which alternates light and dark bands of color on each hair shaft. The warmth glow of their coat resembles wild cats like cougars. The coat comes in four primary colors: ruddy brown, red, blue and fawn. Some associations permit additional colors, however.

Shedding

Weekly grooming is sufficient to maintain your Aby’s coat, but you may need more frequent brushing and bathing during shedding seasons to remove the loose hair faster.

Health

Although responsible breeders do their best to test for and eliminate genetic health problems, cats may still develop certain diseases or conditions. Abyssinians may have a higher risk for the following:

  • Early periodontal disease
  • Hyperesthesia syndrome
  • Patellar luxation
  • Progressive retinal atrophy
  • Pyruvate kinase deficiency
  • Renal amyloidosis

Choosing the Best Food for Abyssinian Cats

Feeding your Aby a high-protein cat food such as Purina Pro Plan True Nature Adult Grain Free Natural Salmon & Egg Recipe will support her activity levels so she has plenty of energy to play throughout the day. 

To explore other products for your Abyssinian, see our Product Selector.

Choosing the Best Food for Abyssinian Kittens

Your Abyssinian kitten needs a complete and balanced kitten food like Purina Pro Plan True Nature Kitten Grain Free Natural Chicken & Egg Recipe to support her development and growth during her first year of life.

History

An Abyssinian was first exhibited in 1871 at the Crystal Palace cat show. She took third place. There are no records of her origin, but her owner said she had been imported from Abyssinia (now Ethiopia) during the war. Although this story gives the breed its name, genetic tests have suggested Abys originated from the coastal regions of Southeast Asia and the Indian Ocean, brought to Europe by British and Dutch traders.

They were first imported to the U.S. in 1900, but a breeding program wasn’t implemented until the 1930s when more Abyssinians were imported from Britain. Only a dozen or so of the cats survived the decimation of World War II in Europe, but thanks to their import to the U.S., the breed bounced back and has steadily grown in popularity.

Facts

  • Some call Abys “Cats from the Blue Nile”, believing they’re the sacred cat of Egyptian Pharaohs.
  • Others believe the breed was created in Britain by crossing silver and brown tabbies with “ticked” coats.
  • The Somali is a longhaired Abyssinian.

Affenpinscher

Your top breed match based on your inputs:

About the Affenpinscher

This ancient toy breed is fun-loving, loyal and fearless. He’s considered a hypoallergenic breed, so he could be a perfect companion for both people with and without allergies.

Temperament

What the Affenpinscher lacks in size, he makes up for with his big personality. He’s curious and funny, bold and outgoing. His intelligence and courage make him a great watchdog, but socialization with people and other animals is crucial.

As a moderately active dog, the Affen needs plenty of playtime and interaction indoors, plus outdoor walks and activities. He gets along well with other dogs, but may not do well in homes where rodents like hamsters and gerbils are kept as pets.

Although playful and entertaining, the Affenpinscher does not enjoy being hugged, squeezed or chased. As such, he’s not the best dog breed for families with young children. 

Characteristics

Affenpinschers are sturdy, yet compact dogs. They have a medium frame and their height and length are about the same, with females slightly longer than males. This creates a square appearance.

Lifespan

12 to 15 years

Colors

Affenpinschers sport a variety of different coat colors, including black, gray, silver, red, black and tan, and beige.

Shedding

As with most breeds, Affens shed seasonally. They have a dense, wiry, medium-length coat. Brush the coat two to three times per week to prevent mats and tangles. The wiry coat is considered hypoallergenic, so the Affenpinscher may be a good dog for people with allergies.

Health

Affenpinschers are a generally healthy breed. Responsible breeders screen for certain health conditions, however. These may include luxating patella, heart and vision problems and hip dysplasia.

Like other breeds with short faces, Affens may have trouble breathing in hot weather. It’s important to prevent them from getting overheated.

Although their small size makes them a great companion for small apartments, Affens may be prone to weight gain. This makes regular exercise and monitoring their caloric intake important.

Best Dog Food for Affenpinscher Dogs & Puppies

Because the Affenpinscher is a toy breed, we recommend choosing a dog food specifically formulated for small dogs.

If you have an Affen puppy, choose a puppy-specific formula with essential nutrients for growth and development. For information on how much or when to feed your Affen dog or puppy, explore our feeding articles here.

History

The Affen’s origins date back to the 1600s in Munich and elsewhere in Germany. The breed started by working in stables, ridding them of pests. Later, they were brought indoors to chase mice out of kitchens.

As the breed further developed, the Affenpinscher’s size was decreased to transform him into a companion dog. The breed may have influenced the development of other European breeds, including the Brussels Griffon and Miniature Schnauzer.

The Berlin Lapdog Club began formulating breed standards for the Affenpinscher in 1902, but the standards weren’t finalized until 1913. Affens were officially recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1936, although clubs dedicated to the breed formed in France and Germany in the late 1800s.

As with many breeds, World War II halted further breeding. Interest in the breed returned in the 1950s, but the Affen didn’t gain widespread attention until 2002. That year, Super Nova won the Toy Group at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. In 2013, Banana Joe won Best in Show at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. 

Facts

  • In German, Affenpinscher means “monkey dog” or “ape terrier.” Presumably, their name is thanks to their ape-like faces.
  • Although Affens don’t fall under the Terrier Group, they were bred to expel rats and other pets as a terrier would.
  • The Affenpinscher is considered a rare breed.

Afghan Hound

Your top breed match based on your inputs:

About the Afghan Hound

Dignified and aloof, the Afghan Hound has a happy temperament and makes an excellent family companion.

Temperament

The Afghan Hound doesn’t just look regal. He has an aristocratic air and independent nature. In spite of this, he’s sweet and can even be silly—especially as a puppy. Afghans are loyal to their immediate human family, but may snub guests.

As an active breed, Afghans need plenty of exercise and adequate nutrition to fuel their high energy levels. Bred to hunt and chase prey by sight, this sighthound has strong instincts to run after anything it deems as prey. Even with consistent training, it’s not advised to walk an Afghan off-leash. Outdoor play areas should have a high, secure fence. They need plenty of room to run at full speed to burn off pent-up energy.

Characteristics

Afghans have an athletic body with protruding hipbones. This unique breed trait does not mean the dog is underweight.

Instead, the hip joints pivot, which gives them the ability to cover a lot of ground quickly and overcome obstacles with ease. Their large paw pads serve as shock absorbers, protecting their joints from harsh terrain.

Lifespan

12 to 14 years

Colors

The Afghan Hound comes in an array of different colors, including black, black and silver, black and tan, blue, blue and cream, red, silver or white. Afghans may also have markings such as a black mask, brindle, brindle black mask, brindle domino or domino.

Shedding

Although they require more grooming than other breeds, this long-coated breed doesn’t shed much. Afghan puppies require little maintenance, thanks to their short coats. The long coat that develops during adolescence needs regular grooming.

Daily brushing helps keep the coat tangle- and mat-free and removes dirt and debris. Regular bathing is also needed.

Health

Afghan Hounds have lower stores of body fat than other breeds, which makes them more sensitive to anesthesia. Experts recommend finding a veterinarian experienced with sighthounds if your Afghan needs surgery.

Their deep chest increases the risk of bloat, a sudden and often life-threatening swelling of the abdomen.

Responsible breeders screen for hip, eye and thyroid problems. The Afghan’s long-hanging ears increases the risk of ear infection.

Best Dog Food for Afghan Hounds & Puppies

Active breeds like the Afghan Hound can benefit from high-protein dog food to support their high energy levels.

If you have an Afghan puppy, look for puppy food specifically formulated with essential nutrients to support his growth and development throughout his first year of life.

Explore all our dry dog food products here. For more information on how much or when to feed your Afghan dog or puppy, explore our feeding articles.

    History

    The Afghan Hound is one of the oldest purebred dogs. So old, in fact, it was developed thousands of years before written records were kept.

    The breed’s origins have been traced back to areas of Afghanistan, India and Pakistan, but it’s impossible to pinpoint an exact region due to its lengthy history.

    Afghans were hunting companions to Asia’s elite mountain kingdoms. They hunted large prey, both in the desert and mountains. They were prized for the ability to hunt without human direction.

    Although a fixture in ancient Eastern cultures, Afghan Hounds weren’t discovered by Western cultures until the 1800s. English officers traveling home from time spent in the far-reaches of the British Empire brought the breed back to Europe with them.

    By the 1900s, Afghan Hounds were the breed of choice among Britain’s upper classes. The American Kennel Club (AKC) first registered the breed in 1927, but it didn’t gain popularity in the U.S. until the 1930s. The Afghan Hound went on to win Best in Show at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in 1957 and again in 1983.

    Facts

    • The Afghan’s long, flowing coat protected him from the harsh desert and mountainous climates where they originated.
    • As sighthounds, Afghans have panoramic vision and their unique hip joints give them astounding speed. These traits allow them to easily spot and pursue their prey.
    • Pablo Picasso’s sculpture of his Afghan Hound, Kabul, stands in Daley Plaza in Chicago.
    • A 1962 painting by Picasso, Femme au Chien, features an Afghan Hound. In 2012, the painting sold for more than $10 Million.
    • When Barbie’s Afghan Hound named Beauty was introduced, the breed’s popularity soared in America.
    • The first cloned dog was an Afghan Hound named “Snuppy” in 2005.
    • One of the first Afghan Hounds brought to America belonged to Zeppo Marx of the Marx Brothers in 1926.

    Airedale Terrier

    Your top breed match based on your inputs:

    About the Airedale Terrier

    The Airedale Terrier originated in the Valley of Aire in England, where factory workers bred them to be good hunters, as well as strong, intelligent guard dogs and companions.

    Temperament

    A sturdy breed with a hard, wiry coat and a “can-do” attitude, the multitalented Airedale Terrier has played roles in police work, rodent control and hunting game. Patient with children and a bold, determined protector, he is also a wonderful family pet. 

    Airedales are all-around athletes, always ready for family activities and sports. 

    Characteristics

    The Airedale is the king of the Terrier group. His dense, wiry coat showcases distinctive markings of black and tan, and his alert, bearded face is framed by alert, folded ears. 

    Airedales move like royalty, with a graceful, confident gait. 

    Lifespan

    11 to 14 years

    Colors

    The Airedale Terrier’s coat is a combination of either black and tan or grizzle and tan.

    Shedding

    Weekly brushing of the Airedale Terrier’s short, wiry coat keeps shedding to a minimum. Otherwise this breed is low shedding.
     
    Full grooming, including bathing, brushing and clipping, should be done three to four times a year.

    Health

    Airedale Terriers are a generally healthy breed. Responsible breeders check for hip dysplasia. 

    Best Dog Food for Airedale Terrier Dogs & Puppies

    Airedale Terriers may benefit from a quality adult dog food. For Airedales who need help with weight management, consider a healthy weight formula

    Airedale puppies should eat puppy food for their first year of life to aid in their growth and development.  

    History

    The king of Terriers, the Airedale Terrier’s history ironically started not with royalty, but with working class breeders—factory hands and mill workers who wanted dogs to hunt ducks and rats. Several breeds are involved in the Airedale’s family tree, among them the Otterhound, Irish Terrier and Bedlington Terrier

    Airedales have done an outstanding job in many roles throughout history. During World War I they served as messengers for the British Armed Forces. In America they gained fame as “triple-threat” hunting dogs for their ability to work with waterfowl, upland game birds and furred prey. 

    With jobs ranging from ratter to big-game hunter, from warrior to herder, from K-9 cop to babysitter, time and time again this breed has proven its versatility.  

    Facts

    • Among famous Airedale Terrier owners are Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Warren Harding, Calvin Coolidge and author John Steinbeck.
    • The Airedale Terrier was recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1888.
    • The Airedale was one of the first breeds used by police in Germany and Great Britain.

    Akita

    Your top breed match based on your inputs:

    About the Akita

    Developed in the mountains of Japan, the courageous Akita is fiercely loyal and protective of his family.

    Temperament

    The Akita is moderately active and energetic, so he needs a couple long walks or jogs plus some play time each day. Although loyal and loving to his family, the Akita is suspicious of strangers. This can make him a good guard dog, but without proper training and socialization, his suspicions can become aggressive.

    Akitas thrive on human interaction and will show their silly side to their family, they are often intolerant of other animals and children who don’t understand boundaries. 

    Characteristics

    As a large breed, the Akita’s muscular body and large head are imposing. The ears stand erect atop the broad head, balanced by a bushy tail that curls over his back.

    Lifespan

    10 to 13 years

    Colors

    The Akita can have an array of different colors, masks and markings.

    Shedding

    Akitas are self-groomers, but their thick, double coats still require weekly brushing. They shed minimally year-round, but the dense undercoat sheds twice a year. Brushing more frequently during these periods will help rid them of the loose hair.

    Health

    An Akita may be prone to weight gain, and like other large-sized dogs, they have a higher risk of bloat.

    Other health conditions to watch for include eye problems, thyroid disorders and hip dysplasia. Responsible breeders screen for these issues to create a healthier breed overall.

    Best Dog Food for Akita Dogs & Puppies

    Akita dogs will thrive on a complete and balanced dry or wet dog food. Akitas may also benefit from a high-protein formula to support a healthy, active lifestyle. Of course, Akita puppies need a complete and balanced puppy food for the first year of life.

    For information on how much or when to feed your Akita dog or puppy, explore our feeding articles here.

      History

      The Akita’s ancestry dates back to the early 17th century. In the prefecture of northern Japan where the breed gets its name, a competition was held to create a versatile hunting dog. Over time, the Akita was used to hunt big game like wild boar, elk and even bears.

      Ownership of these imposing hunters was once restricted to members of the Imperial family and their court. The breed nearly went extinct several times over the course of its long history, and a national breed club in Japan eventually formed to help ensure the Akita’s longevity.

      After World War II, American soldiers brought these dogs back to the States with them. It wasn’t until 1972, however, that the breed was recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC).

      Facts

      • Helen Keller is credited with bringing the first Akita to the U.S., having received a puppy from the Ministry of Education during a visit to Japan in 1937, even though the first Akitas were probably brought back by soldiers returning home from war.
      • Akitas are a symbol of health, happiness and longevity in Japan. Akita figurines are often gifted to new parents following the birth of a child.
      • Hachi: A Dog’s Tale is a movie based on a real-life Akita named Hachiko. He spent nine years in a Japanese train station waiting for his owner (who died suddenly and unexpectedly) to return from work.
      • The Akita perceives “prolonged eye contact” as a challenge and may respond aggressively.

      Alaskan Malamute

      Your top breed match based on your inputs:

      About the Alaskan Malamute

      One of the oldest Arctic sled dogs, the Alaskan Malamute was first bred in Alaska to carry large loads over long distances. A majestic, dignified breed, the Malamute is highly intelligent and learns quickly, but he also can be strong-willed. Loyal, devoted and highly athletic, he is an affectionate family companion that enjoys outdoor activities. The Malamute needs daily exercise, and his thick, coarse coat requires daily brushing and occasional baths.

      Did you know 
      The Alaskan Malamute was named after a native Innuit tribe called the Mahlemuts, who settled in Alaska.

      American Bobtail Cat Breed

      Your top breed match based on your inputs:

      About the American Bobtail Cat Breed

      The American Bobtail is an athletic breed that looks like a bobtailed wildcat and has many dog-like tendencies.

      Temperament

      Despite their somewhat wild appearance, American Bobtails are devoted companion cats who fit perfectly into families. Social and easygoing, they get along well with children and other four-legged pets.

      Confident and friendly, Bobtails are highly intelligent pets with dog-like personalities. They love games like fetch and hide-and-seek, and even enjoy walking on a leash with their people.

      Characteristics

      The American Bobtail bears a distinct resemblance to a bobtailed wildcat. From her markings and alert, hunter’s gaze to her short, expressive tail, her appearance suggests a scaled-down version of that wild cat.

      Lifespan

      13 to 15 years

      Colors

      The American Bobtail’s coat can come in any pattern, including black, brown, chocolate, cinnamon, blue, lilac, fawn, red and cream, with or without white.

      Shedding

      The American Bobtail is a moderate shedding breed. Whether medium or long, her coat requires brushing only a couple of times a week to remove loose hair.

      Health

      American Bobtails are a very strong and healthy breed, with little known about genetic predisposition to health problems. However, they may develop hip dysplasia, and tailless American Bobtails can have spinal problems that affect their ability to control defecation. 

      Best Cat Food for American Bobtail Cats & Kittens

      American Bobtails will generally thrive on the nutrition of a quality adult cat food. For Bobtails who need help with weight management, consider a healthy weight formula.  

      American Bobtail kittens should eat a kitten food for their first year of life to aid in their growth and development. 

      History

      Initially, the American Bobtail developed through natural selection. The breed’s foundation lies in feral domestic cats that had natural bobtails.

      Purposeful development of the breed began in the late 1960s, when John and Brenda Sanders were vacationing in the American southwest. They brought home a brown tabby kitten with a short tail, whom they found during their travels.

      The kitten later mated with the couple’s non-pedigreed domestic color point cat. Their kittens inherited the distinctive short tail, and attracted the attention of cat fanciers, who saw the possibility of a new breed of cats.

      Through selective breeding, the American Bobtail breed was officially established.

      Facts

      • The American Bobtail has a naturally short bobtail that can be seen clearly above the back when she is alert. No tail is exactly the same, but the average length is 1 to 4 inches.
      • American Bobtails make excellent therapy pets.
      • Bobtails are slow to mature, taking two to three years to reach adult size.

      American Curl Cat Breed

      Your top breed match based on your inputs:

      About the American Curl Cat Breed

      With unique ears that curl back, and an inquisitive expression reminiscent of happy surprise, the American Curl brings a smile to everyone who meets her.

      Temperament

      A friendly, people-oriented breed, American Curls are known as the Peter Pan of cats because they retain their kitten-like personality throughout life. With her outstanding temperament, the Curl makes an affectionate soulmate and easily adjusts to other pets and children.

      Characteristics

      The American Curl has distinctive curled ears that form a graceful arc, giving her an alert, perky expression. In addition to their ears, Curls are known for their silky, flat coat which can be long or short.

      Lifespan

      13+ years

      Colors

      The American Curl’s coat can be brown, white, black, blue, red, cream, chocolate, lilac, silver or golden, with various patterns and shadings.

      Shedding

      The American Curl has two coat varieties: shorthair and longhair. Both coats are low-shedding

      Like other shorthaired breeds, shorthair Curls need only weekly brushing, while longhair Curls should be brushed twice a week to help reduce matting and tangles.

      Health

      Due to a large gene pool, the American Curl is a generally healthy breed with no common genetic health issues. However, her ears should be checked and cleaned often to prevent infection.

      Best Cat Food for American Curl Cats & Kittens

      American Curls will generally thrive on the nutrition of a quality adult cat food. For Curls who need help with weight management, consider a healthy weight formula.  

      American Curl kittens should eat a kitten food for their first year of life to aid in their growth and development. 

      History

      The American Curl is a pedigree breed with humble beginnings—specifically a stray, longhaired black female cat with curled ears who showed up (and decided to stay) at the Lakewood, California home of Joe and Grace Ruga in 1981.

      Shulamith, as she was named, is the original American Curl to which all pedigreed Curls can be traced. When she gave birth to curl-eared kittens about six months later, the debate about the genetic origins of the “novelty” ears began, followed by a selective breeding program to develop a show breed.

      Renowned feline geneticist Roy Robinson analyzed data from 81 litters (383 kittens), and found that the ear-curling gene is autosomal dominant, so a cat with even one copy of the gene will show the trait.

      Facts

      • American Curl kittens are born with straight ears that begin to curl backward after three to five days.

      American English Coonhound

      Your top breed match based on your inputs:

      About the American English Coonhound

      A descendant of the English Foxhound, the American English Coonhound is known for his speed and endurance. This athletic hound, which is capable of hunting raccoon and fox all night long, needs regular exercise to stay in condition. The American English Coonhound is sociable with humans and other dogs. The breed’s hard, protective coat needs little grooming.

      Did you know
      The American English Coonhound is a descendant of English Foxhounds, called Virginia Hounds, which were imported from England to the U.S. colonies in the 17th century by George Washington, an avid fox hunter. When trailing, these hounds have a distinctive “bawl,” or nonstop barking, that signals their enthusiasm and proximity to the prey.

      American Eskimo Dog

      Your top breed match based on your inputs:

      About the American Eskimo Dog

      The American Eskimo Dog, which descended from European spitz-type dogs, was brought to the U.S. by German immigrants. The breed comes in three size varieties: Standard, Miniature and Toy. Nicknamed the “Eskie,” this breed has a heavy white coat that requires weekly brushing. Although intelligent, affectionate and playful, the American Eskimo Dog can be skeptical of strangers.

      Did you know
      Highly intelligent, trainable and agile, the American Eskimo Dog was a popular circus dog that performed tricks in acts in the late 19th century. An Eskie named Stout’s Pal Pierre was the first dog to walk a tightrope.

      American Foxhound

      Your top breed match based on your inputs:

      About the American Foxhound

      A rare breed, the American Foxhound was developed by George Washington in the 1700s. Bred to run fast, the American Foxhound is ideal for pet owners in rural areas but also is adaptable to smaller homes if provided adequate exercise. A mild-tempered and easygoing breed, the American Foxhound gets along well with children and most pets. Stubborn and independent at times, he benefits from early training.

      Did you know
      The American Foxhound is the official state dog of Virginia.

      American Shorthair Cat

      Your top breed match based on your inputs:

      About the American Shorthair Cat

      Formerly used to keep rodents and vermin away from food stores, the American Shorthair still enjoys exercising her hunting skills on unsuspecting insects. As a smart, moderately active feline, she enjoys learning tricks and challenging her intelligence with puzzles and interactive toys.

      Temperament

      She’s adaptable and good-natured, which makes her the ideal family companion. Although she loves attention from her people, including children, the American Shorthair does not like being carried and is fairly independent. She may curl up in your lap on occasion, but she may prefer to sit alongside you instead. She’ll get along fine with a cat-friendly dog, but her hunting instincts may take over with pet birds and other small animals.

      Characteristics

      As a working cat, American Shorthairs have a stocky, muscular build. Their muscular legs lend themselves to the American’s agility and endurance. They have a large head and full face, medium-sized ears and large, wide eyes.

      Lifespan

      15 to 20 years

      Colors

      American Shorthairs are a diverse breed with an array of colors and patterns. Silver tabby is one of the most common and popular, however.

      Shedding

      Your American Shorthair will shed but combing a couple times per week removes dead hair and redistributes skin oils to keep her coat shiny and prevent dry, itchy skin.

      Health

      The American Shorthair is a hearty and healthy breed. Some instances of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy have been recorded, but it’s unknown if the condition is hereditary. Their flat face also makes the breed more susceptible to ocular and respiratory issues. They are genetically predisposed to mouth and gum disease and their laid-back nature increases their risk of obesity. Reputable breeders test thoroughly to avoid breeding cats with genetic diseases.

      Choosing the Best Food for American Shorthair Cats

      Because American Shorthairs are generally healthy, a complete and balanced cat food should be sufficient for their needs. If your American puts on weight due to inactivity, however, you may want to consider a healthy weight formula like Purina Pro Plan Focus Adult Weight Management Formula or Purina ONE Healthy Metabolism, and if she regularly develops hairballs, consider a specially formulated cat food to help control them, such as Purina Pro Plan Focus Hairball Management Chicken & Rice Formula.

      To explore other products for your American Shorthair, see our Product Selector.

      Choosing the Best Food for American Shorthair Kittens

      Like several other breeds, American Shorthairs are slow to mature, with many not reaching their full size until 3 or 4 years of age. To support your American kitten’s growth and development, select a complete and balanced kitten food such as Purina Pro Plan Focus Kitten Chicken & Rice Formula or Purina ONE Healthy Kitten Formula during her first year or so of life. Switch her to a complete and balanced adult cat food after her first birthday.

      History

      American Shorthairs may have descended from other domestic shorthairs brought over on the Mayflower in 1620, or even earlier by the first settlers of Jamestown or even Spanish explorers in Florida. A 1634 publication credits these domestic shorthairs with saving New England crops from squirrels and chipmunks. They were exhibited at the first U.S. cat show in 1895 and Cat Fanciers Association (CFA) recognized them as a founding breed in 1906.

      Facts

      • The breed wasn’t called “American Shorthair until 1966, when it was given the name to distinguish it from other domestic shorthairs and random-bred shorthairs.
      • Because they resemble so many other domestic shorthair cats, the only way to know yours is American is with certified breed papers.
      • An American Shorthair was named CFA’s “Cat of the Year” in 1965, 1984 and 1996.